Health Panel

Learn about common health screenings that you can receive as a part of Mira's Health Panel.

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Complete Blood Count (CBC)

Introduction
Test Overview
A complete blood count (CBC) gives your doctor a clearer picture of your overall health, including whether you have an infection, inflammation, or certain cancers. The results of your CBC will give more details about three types of cells in your blood: white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.

Common Symptoms
There are usually no symptoms when ordering as part of a routine screening.

Who should get tested?
A CBC is commonly ordered as a routine screening. Those experiencing symptoms such as fatigue, frequent bruising, or having some inflammation may also benefit from getting screened.

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with performing a CBC test.

How to prepare for the test
The test for CBC includes a blood sample from a vein or fingertip. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results

Hematocrit
Hematocrit shows the percentage of red blood cells in your blood. The hematocrit value rises when your red blood cells increase in number or size. And the hematocrit value falls when your red blood cells decrease in number or size.

● High Result:
Your hematocrit value is high. A high hematocrit value may mean that you have more red blood cells than is normal. This could be a sign that your body requires more oxygen. Your body may need more oxygen if you smoke, are dehydrated, live at high altitude, or have certain lung, kidney, or blood diseases. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

● Normal Result:
Your hematocrit value is within the normal range.

● Low Result:
Your hematocrit value is low. A low hematocrit value means that you
have fewer red blood cells than is normal. This is called anemia. Certain conditions
can cause anemia, including bleeding, bone marrow disorders, cancer, damage to
the red blood cells (like sickle cell), and low vitamin and mineral amounts in the
body. Certain medications can also cause anemia. However, a single low value may
not mean that you have a health issue.

Hemoglobin
Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells. It helps to carry oxygen from the lungs to your heart and other organs. Your body needs this oxygen to stay healthy. Hemoglobin also carries carbon dioxide from your organs and tissues back to your lungs to be exhaled.

● High Result:
Your hemoglobin level is high. A high hemoglobin level may mean you
have more red blood cells than is normal. This could be a sign that your body
requires more oxygen. Your body may need more oxygen if you smoke, are
dehydrated, live at high altitudes, or have certain lung, kidney, or blood diseases.
However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

● Normal Result:
Your hemoglobin level is within the normal range

● Low Result:
Your hemoglobin level is low. A low hemoglobin value may mean you
have fewer red blood cells than is normal. Many things, including anemia, can cause
this loss of red blood cells. Certain conditions can cause anemia, including bleeding,
bone marrow disorders, cancer, damage to the red blood cells (like sickle cell), and
low vitamin and mineral amounts in the body. However, a single low value may not
mean that you have a health issue.

Platelets
Platelets help your blood to form clots when you’re bleeding or have an injury. The platelets go to the site of the damage and form clots to start the healing process.

● High Count: Your platelet count is high. A high platelet count can mean that you
have an infection or inflammation in your body. When your platelets are high, you’re
at risk for blood clots. However, a single high count may not mean that you have a
health issue.

● Normal Count: Your platelet count is within the normal range.

● Low Count: Your platelet count is low. A low platelet count can put you at risk for
bleeding and bruising. Certain diseases and conditions can cause a low platelet
count, including bone marrow disorders, viral infections, lupus, anemia, and certain
cancers. Certain medications can also cause a low platelet count. However, a single
low count may not mean that you have a health issue.

Red blood cells (RBC)
Red blood cells are formed in the bone marrow and contain a protein called hemoglobin. This protein carries oxygen from the lungs to all parts of your body, like your heart and other organs. Your body needs this oxygen to stay healthy.

● High Count: Your red blood cell count is high. A high red blood cell count can mean
a few things. It may mean that you have more cells carrying oxygen in your blood
than is normal. This could be a sign that your body requires more oxygen. Your
body may need more oxygen if you smoke, are dehydrated, live at high altitude, or
have certain lung, kidney, or blood diseases. However, a single high count may not
mean that you have a health issue.

● Normal Count: Your red blood cell count is within the normal range.

● Low Count: Your red blood cell count is low. A low red blood cell count can mean a
few things. It may mean that you have fewer cells carrying oxygen in your blood
than is normal. This is called anemia. Certain conditions can cause anemia, including
bleeding, bone marrow disorders, cancer, damage to the red blood cells (like sickle
cell), and low vitamin and mineral amounts in the body. Certain medications can
also cause anemia. However, a single low count may not mean that you have a
health issue.

White blood cells (WBC)
White blood cells are formed in the bone marrow. They help protect your body from
infection and cancer, and play a role in allergies and inflammation. There are five major
types of WBCs: monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Your WBC count includes all of these different types and reflects your overall ability to fight infection. Your doctor may use this test, as well as assess your medical history, to get a full picture of your overall health.

● High Count: Your white blood cell count is high. A high white blood cell count can
mean a few things. In some cases, it might mean that you have an infection.
Otherwise, it could mean that you have inflammation, stress, or a response to
medication. However, a single high count may not mean that you have a health
issue.

● Normal Count: Your white blood cell count is within the normal range.

●Low Count: Your white blood cell count is low. You may be more at risk for illness
and infection when you have a low white blood cell count. Certain conditions can
cause a low white blood cell count, including autoimmune diseases, immune system
disorders, bone marrow disorders, certain cancers, and viral infections. Certain
medications can also cause a low blood cell count. However, a single low count may
not mean that you have a health issue.

Next Steps
Abnormal Results

It’s important to share your results with your doctor. Your doctor will evaluate
all your results along with your medical history and any symptoms. Together,
you can figure out the next steps and create a plan that’s right for you.
Get any other follow-up tests or medication as directed by your doctor.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the
PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and
a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

Normal Results
It’s important to share your results with your doctor to see if there are any
next steps for you at this time.
Get any other follow-up tests or medication as directed by your doctor.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the
PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and
a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

Questions For Your Provider
Abnormal Results
Do I need any other tests?
Should I start any new medication(s)? Do we need to make any changes to my current medication(s)?
Based on my medical history, is there anything I should be concerned about?
What lifestyle changes should I make based on my current health status?
Is there anything else I should be thinking about regarding my health?

Normal Results
 Do I need any other tests?
 What lifestyle changes should I make based on my current health status?
 Is there anything else I should be thinking about regarding my health?

Helpful Resources
American Society of Hematology: Patient Information
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Health Topics
MedlinePlus: Blood Disorders

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

Introduction
Test Overview
A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a blood test that checks how well your body uses energy (called metabolism) and how well your organs function. This test can tell your doctor whether you have a condition such as diabetes, liver disease, or kidney disease. This test can also monitor a current condition you have, such as high blood pressure, or to check your kidneys or liver for any medication side effects.

Common Symptoms
There are usually no symptoms when ordering as part of a routine screening.

Who should get tested?
A CMP is commonly ordered as a routine screening.

Testing Process

Risks Involved

There are no risks involved with performing a CMP test.

How to prepare for the test
The test for CMP includes a blood sample from a vein or fingertip. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results
Alkaline Phosphatase

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme found in your liver, bones, and other tissues. This enzyme helps your liver and bones work as they should. ALP is released in your blood when there is an issue with your liver, bones, or gallbladder.

●High Result: Your ALP level is high. A high ALP level can mean a few things. It can mean that you have an issue with your liver or bones. Certain conditions can cause high ALP levels, including bile duct disorders, inflammation of the gallbladder, gallstones, and certain liver and bone diseases. Medications can also cause a high ALP level. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your ALP level is within the normal range.

●Low Result: Your ALP level is low. Certain things can cause low ALP levels, including blood transfusions, not getting enough of the right nutrients (malnutrition), and other rare conditions. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue. 

ALT
Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme found in your liver and kidneys. This enzyme helps your liver and kidneys work as they should. ALT is released in your body when there is liver damage or inflammation. Your doctor may use the results of this test, as well as assess your lifestyle and dietary habits, to get a full picture of your liver health.

●High Result: Your ALT level is high. A high ALT can mean a few things. It can mean that your liver is not working as it should or may be damaged or inflamed. This could be due to your lifestyle (drinking too much alcohol or an unhealthy diet) or certain liver diseases. Medications can also cause a high ALT level. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your ALT level is within the normal range.

AST
Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) is an enzyme found in your liver and heart. This enzyme helps your liver and muscles work as they should. AST is released in your body when there is liver or muscle damage or inflammation. Your doctor may use this test, as well as assess your lifestyle and dietary habits, to get a full picture of your liver health.

●High Result: Your AST level is high. A high AST level can mean a few things. It can mean that your liver may not be working as it should or may be damaged or inflamed. This could be due to your lifestyle (drinking too much alcohol or an unhealthy diet) or certain liver diseases. Medications can also cause a high AST level. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your AST level is within normal range.

Bilirubin
Bilirubin is a substance found in bile, which is a yellow fluid made by the liver that helps you digest nutrients. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, extra bilirubin can build up in the blood.

●High Result: Your bilirubin level is high. A high bilirubin can mean a few things. It may mean that your liver may not be working as it should or may be damaged. High levels of bilirubin can cause yellowing of your skin and eyes (jaundice). Certain conditions can cause high bilirubin levels, including hepatitis and cirrhosis, as well as gallbladder disease. Certain medications or foods can also cause high bilirubin levels. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your bilirubin level is within normal range.

Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)
Your liver produces urea nitrogen as part of the process of breaking down proteins. Once urea nitrogen is released into your blood, your kidneys filter it out as waste. If your kidneys cannot remove nitrogen urea from your blood, your BUN level rises.

●High Result: Your BUN level is high. A high BUN level can mean that your kidneys may not be working as they should or may be damaged. Certain conditions can cause high BUN levels, including kidney disease, diabetes or high blood pressure. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your BUN level is within normal range.

●Low Result: Your BUN level is low. A low BUN level may be caused by liver disease, not getting enough of the right nutrients (malnutrition), or from drinking too much fluid. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue.

Calcium
Calcium is an important mineral that helps support your heart, muscle, bone, and nerve function. Most calcium is found within the bones and very little should be in the blood.

●High Result: Your calcium level is high. A high calcium level can mean a few things. It can weaken your bones, create kidney stones, and get in the way of your heart and brain function. Signs of a high calcium level include increased thirst, bone pain, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and muscle weakness. Certain conditions can cause a high calcium level, including an overactive parathyroid gland, certain cancers, and other conditions. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your calcium level is within normal range.

●Low Result: Your calcium level is low. A low calcium level can mean a few things. It can affect your muscles, kidney, and brain. Signs of a low calcium level include stomach cramps, muscle cramps, or tingling fingers. Certain conditions can cause a low calcium level, including an underactive parathyroid gland, not getting enough of the right nutrients (malnutrition), kidney disease, and other diseases and conditions. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue. 

Carbon Dioxide
Carbon dioxide (or CO2) is carried in the blood to your lungs, where you breathe it out. The amount of carbon dioxide in your blood (bicarbonate) helps to maintain your body’s acid-base balance (pH balance). Too much or too little carbon dioxide in the blood could be a sign of an illness or a condition of your lungs, kidneys, or metabolism.

●High Result: Your blood carbon dioxide level is high. Certain things can cause high carbon dioxide levels, including lung diseases, vomiting and diarrhea, conditions causing your body to be too alkaline (not pH balanced), and some medications. You may need to seek medical attention right away if you’ve recently had vomiting or diarrhea, weakness, tiredness, or difficulty breathing that has gone on for more than a few days. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your carbon dioxide level is within normal range.

●Low Result: Your blood carbon dioxide level is low. Certain things can cause low carbon dioxide levels, including diarrhea, kidney disease, shock, conditions causing your body to be too acidic (not pH balanced), and some medications. You may need to seek medical attention right away if you’ve recently had vomiting or diarrhea, weakness, tiredness, or difficulty breathing that has gone on for more than a few days. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue.

Creatinine
Creatinine is a waste product that your muscles produce. Your kidneys filter it out of your blood. A creatinine test measures the level of creatinine in your blood and shows whether your kidneys are working as they should.

●High Result: Your creatinine level is high. Certain things can cause high levels of creatinine. It may mean that your kidneys may not be working as they should. Certain conditions can cause high creatinine levels, including chronic kidney disease and dehydration. Certain medications can also cause high creatinine levels. You may also have high creatinine levels if you exercise heavily, or eat a lot of protein. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your creatinine level is within normal range. A normal creatinine level means that your kidneys are likely working as they should.

●Low Result: Your creatinine level is low. Certain conditions can cause low levels of creatinine levels, including low muscle mass or not getting enough of the right nutrients (malnutrition). However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue.

eGFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate)
Estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR, is a test that measures how well your kidneys remove waste from your blood. The eGFR test can help to identify the early stages of kidney disease before you feel any symptoms.

●Low Result: Your eGFR level is low. Certain conditions can cause low levels of eGFR, including diabetes and high blood pressure. It’s important to catch kidney disease early. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your eGFR is within normal range.

Glucose
Glucose is also known as blood sugar. After eating, a hormone in your body called insulin helps move glucose from your blood into your cells to give you energy. People whose bodies don’t make enough insulin or who don’t respond well to insulin have diabetes. Aglucose test helps screen for diabetes. It can also help those who already have diabetes to see whether their blood sugar is too high or too low.

●High Result: Your glucose level is high. A high glucose level can mean a few things. It can be caused by diabetes, certain medications, or illness. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your glucose level is within normal range.

●Low Result: Your glucose level is low. A low glucose level can mean a few things. It can be caused by not eating enough or getting too much exercise without eating. It can also be caused by diabetes, certain medications, or illness. You may have symptoms such as sweating, heart flutters, hunger, trembling, and anxiety. It’s important to follow up with your doctor if you’ve recently had any of these symptoms. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral in your body that helps support normal body processes, including muscle function, cell function, and fluid balance. A potassium test helps screen for kidney disease, irregular heartbeat, or high blood pressure.

●High Result: Your potassium level is high. Certain conditions can cause a high potassium level, including kidney disease, dehydration, and other conditions. Certain medications can also cause a high potassium level. A high potassium can make you sick. That's why it’s important to talk to your doctor right away to figure out the cause.

●Normal Result: Your potassium level is within normal range.

●Low Result: Your potassium level is low. Certain conditions can cause a low potassium level, including diarrhea and vomiting, diabetes, and other conditions. Certain medications can also cause a low potassium level. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue.

Sodium
Sodium is a mineral in your body that helps support normal body processes, including nerve function, muscle function, cell function, and fluid balance. A sodium test helps screen for liver or kidney disease, heart failure, or high blood pressure.

●High Result: Your sodium level is high. Certain conditions can cause a high sodium level, including dehydration or kidney damage. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue.

●Normal Result: Your sodium level is within normal range.

●Low Result: Your sodium level is low. Certain things can cause a low sodium level, including diarrhea, vomiting, sweating, drinking too much water, kidney disease, heart failure, cirrhosis, and not getting enough of the right nutrients (malnutrition). Certain medications can also cause a low sodium level. However, a single low value may not mean that you have a health issue.

Next Steps
Abnormal Results
It’s important to share your results with your doctor. Your doctor will evaluate your results, medical history, and any symptoms. Together, you can figure out the next steps and create a plan that’s right for you. 
Take any other follow-up tests or medication as directed by your doctor.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

Normal Results
It’s important to share your results with your doctor. Your doctor will evaluate your results, medical history, and any symptoms. Together, you can figure out the next steps and create a plan that’s right for you. 
Take any other follow-up tests or medication as directed by your doctor.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

Questions For Your Provider
Abnormal Results
● Do I need any other tests?
● Should I start any new medication(s)? Do we need to make any changes to my current medication(s)?
● Based on my medical history, is there anything I should be concerned about?
● What lifestyle changes should I make based on my current health status?
Is there anything else I should be thinking about regarding my health?

Normal Results
● Do I need any other tests?
● What lifestyle changes should I make based on my current health status?
● Is there anything else I should be thinking about regarding my health?

Helpful Resources
Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) - LabCorp

Urinalysis

Introduction
Test Overview
A urinalysis is a test that checks your urine for different substances, including cells,
bacteria, blood, and waste products. This can help your doctor look at your overall health and can be useful in diagnosing urinary tract infections, kidney conditions, or diabetes. A urinalysis is typically not a definitive diagnostic test. When looking at your urinalysis results, your doctor will evaluate everything together and look for patterns.

Common Symptoms
There are usually no symptoms when ordering as part of a routine screening. However, burning, painful or frequent urination can be signs of an infection.

Who should get tested?
It is common for adults to get a urinalysis as part of an annual health screen. Or, if you are experiencing common symptoms of a urine infection, a test should be performed.

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with performing a urinalysis.

How to prepare for the test
A urinalysis test is performed by collecting a urine sample. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results
General

●Abnormal Results
: If you have results outside of the normal range, your doctor can
help you understand them in the context of your overall health. A single abnormal
value may not mean that you have a health issue. There are many reasons why a
test result may fall outside of the normal range. For example, abnormal results can
be caused by infection, kidney disease, or diabetes. Your doctor will assess the
cause of these results to decide what’s right for your health.

●Normal Results: If your results are within the normal range, you should still share
your results with your doctor. Your doctor will evaluate your results and work with you
to decide what’s right for your health.

Glucose, urine
Glucose is also known as sugar. Glucose is not usually found in the urine. It is filtered by the kidney, then reabsorbed back into the blood. People who have too much sugar in their blood (like people with uncontrolled diabetes) will end up having sugar in their urine because the kidneys can’t reabsorb all the sugar fast enough. This test can help screen for diabetes, as well as other conditions.

●Abnormal Result: Your results detected glucose in your urine. This could be a sign
that you have too much glucose in your blood. This may be caused by diabetes, as
well as other illnesses. However, a single high value may not mean that you have a
health issue. Your doctor can help you understand your results in the context of
your overall health.

●Normal Result: There was no glucose found in your urine.

Ketone, urine
Ketones are substances that are made from the breakdown of fats. Ketones are not usually found in the urine. The body mainly uses glucose, or sugar, for energy. If your body doesn’t get enough sugar (from carbs), it will start to break down fat and use ketones for energy instead. Too much ketones in the blood and urine can lead to serious health complications.

●Abnormal Result: Your results detected ketones in your urine. This could be a sign
that you have too many ketones in your blood. This may be caused by diabetes, as
well as other conditions such as not eating enough carbs, malnutrition, and
pregnancy. If you have diabetes, high levels of ketones can make you very sick.
However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue. Your
doctor can help you understand your results in the context of your overall health.

●Normal Result: There were no ketones found in your urine.

Protein, urine
The kidney is responsible for filtering substances such as waste and protein out of the
blood. If your kidneys aren’t functioning well or are damaged, lots of proteins can leak
through your kidneys and get into the urine. This test measures the level of protein in your urine and shows whether your kidneys are working as they should.

●Abnormal Result: Your results detected protein in your urine. Certain things can
cause high levels of protein in your urine. It may mean that your kidneys are not
working as they should. Certain conditions can cause high protein levels, including
chronic kidney disease and dehydration. Certain medications can also cause high
protein levels. You may also have high protein levels if you exercise heavily.
However, a single high value may not mean that you have a health issue. Your
doctor can help you understand your results in the context of your overall health.

●Normal Result: There was no protein found in your urine.

WBC, Urine
White blood cells (WBCs) help protect your body from infection and play a role in
inflammation. They are usually found in very small amounts in your urine. Your doctor may use this test, as well as assess your medical history and symptoms, to get a check of your bladder or kidney infections.

●Abnormal Result: Your results detected WBCs in your urine. High amounts of WBCs
in your urine may be a sign of inflammation. Certain conditions can cause high
WBCs, including urinary tract infections (UTIs). Further assessment of any symptoms
and other tests are needed to confirm a UTI. However, a single high value may not
mean that you have a health issue. Your doctor can help you understand your
results in the context of your overall health.

●Normal Result: There were no WBCs found in your urine.

Next Steps
● It’s important to share your results with your doctor to see if there are any next steps for you at this time. Your doctor will evaluate your medical history and any symptoms. Together, you can figure out the next steps and create a plan that’s right for you.
● Take any other follow-up tests or medication as directed by your doctor.
● If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth
Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team
member will call you back as soon as possible.

Questions For Your Provider
● Do I need any other tests?
● Should I start any new medication(s)? Do we need to make any changes to my current medication(s)?
● Based on my medical history, is there anything I should be concerned about?
● What lifestyle changes should I make based on my current health status?
● Is there anything else I should be thinking about regarding my health?

Helpful Resources
From the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK):

Bladder Infection (UTI) in Adults
The Urinary Tract and How It Works
Albuminuria, Albumin in the Urine
Hematuria (Blood in the Urine)
What is Chronic Kidney Disease

Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone

Introduction
Test Overview
A thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test is used to check the health of your thyroid. TSH is a hormone produced by your pituitary gland that tells your thyroid to release other important hormones that help with many functions in your body. Too much or too little TSH could mean problems with your thyroid.

Common Symptoms
There are usually no symptoms when ordering as part of a routine screening. Some symptoms of a thyroid disorder include dry skin, unexplained weight loss or weight gain, sleep irregularity, anxiety, hair loss, difficulty sleeping, sensitivity to light, and cold intolerance.

Who should get tested?
It is common for adults to get a thyroid test as part of an annual health screen. Or, if you are experiencing common symptoms of a thyroid disorder, a test should be performed.

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with performing a TSH blood test.

How to prepare for the test
The test for TSH includes a blood sample from a vein or fingertip. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results
Abnormal:
High or low TSH levels are considered abnormal.
Normal:
Your TSH levels are normal

What do your results mean?
Abnormal
● Low:
Your TSH levels are lower than the normal range. Low TSH levels may
mean your thyroid is producing too much hormone (overactive).
● High:
Your TSH levels are higher than the normal range. High TSH levels may
mean your thyroid is not producing enough hormone (underactive).

Normal
Your TSH levels are within the normal range. Normal TSH levels mean that
your thyroid is working as it should.

Next Steps
Abnormal
Talk to your healthcare provider. A TSH test does not explain why TSH levels
are too high or too low. That’s why it’s important to share your results with
your healthcare provider. Together, you can figure out the next steps and
create a plan that’s right for you.
If your healthcare provider prescribes medication, it’s important to take it
exactly as prescribed.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the
PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and
a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

Normal
It’s important to share your results with your healthcare provider. If needed, together you can figure out the next steps and create a plan that’s right for you.
Get any other follow-up tests as directed by your healthcare provider.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the
PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and
a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

Questions For Your Provider
Abnormal
Do I need any other tests?
What is causing this abnormal result?
Are there any risks related to these results?
Do I need to take any new medications or are there any changes to my
current medication(s)?

Normal
Do I need any other tests?
How often should I have a thyroid test?

Helpful Resources
American Thyroid Association: Thyroid Information
American Thyroid Association: Thyroid Function Tests

STI Panel

Learn about common sexually transmitted infections that you can get tested for as a part of Mira's STI Panel.

Order Now
Chlamydia

Introduction
Test Overview
This test checks for the bacteria that causes chlamydia, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States.

Common Symptoms
Painful urination
Pain during sex
Discharge
Pelvic pain
Itching around the genitals

Who should get tested?
This test is recommended for anyone who wants to know about their sexual health, as well as those who:
● Have had unprotected sex
● Share or have shared injection drug needles.
● Have symptoms of an STI.
● Are concerned they’ve been exposed to an STI.
● Are pregnant.

Get tested every year if you:
● Are a man who has sex with men.
● Are a sexually-active woman under 25 years of age.
● Are a woman 25 years of age or older with new or multiple sex partners, or your partner has an STI.

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with being tested for chlamydia.

How to prepare for the test
A chlamydia test is done through a urine sample. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results

●Positive:
If you test positive for chlamydia, please note that it is a curable STI. Many people with chlamydia have no signs or symptoms. You can pass the infection to others even if you do not have symptoms. It’s important to get treated right away. If left untreated, chlamydia can cause serious health issues in both women and men.

●Negative: If you test negative, that means that you are not infected with chlamydia

Next Steps
Positive
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can speak to a board-certified, PWNHealth doctor at no additional cost. The doctor may be able to prescribe medication for you, if appropriate. To schedule your session, please call the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. 
You can also take your results to your doctor, a walk-in clinic, a sexual health clinic, or a local health department to get treatment.
This test only checks for chlamydia in the genital area. If you engage in risky sexual behavior or think you may have been exposed in the throat or rectum, it’s important to ask your doctor about testing for infection in those areas.
Talk to your partners about your results. Your partners should get tested too. There are resources available from your local health department that can help you notify your partners.

Negative
If you’re having symptoms, it could mean that you have an infection or another condition. Ask your doctor if you need further testing. 
If you think you may have been exposed to a STI, it may be too soon to tell if you have chlamydia. Ask your doctor if you need to get retested.
This only checks for chlamydia in the genital area. If you engage in risky sexual behavior or think you may have been exposed in the throat or rectum, it’s important to ask your doctor about testing for infection in those areas.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.,Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

More Information
Positive
If a doctor prescribes medication to you, it’s important to take it exactly as prescribed. You should also take all of the medication, even if your symptoms go away before you finish all of it. Do not share your medication with anyone.
Do not have sex for at least seven (7) days after you’ve finished your medication. You may need to be tested again after the medication is complete to check that the infection is gone. Ask your doctor if getting tested again is right for you.

Questions For Your Provider
Positive
Should I get tested for other STIs?
What is the treatment for chlamydia?
Is there anything else I need to know about the treatment for chlamydia?
How will I know when I can no longer spread this infection to others?
When can I have sex again?
Can chlamydia cause other health problems?
(If pregnant) How does chlamydia affect my pregnancy?

Tips To Prevent Infection
●Practice safe sex. You can get chlamydia again, even if you have had it in the past.
●Use condoms and dental dams every time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. These safe-sex practices lower your chances of getting an STI. Other birth control methods like the pill and IUDs will not protect you from getting an STI.
●Avoid sexual contact with anyone who has symptoms of an STI or who may have been exposed to one.
●Talk to your partners about their STI history before having sex.

Helpful Resources
STI Information from the CDC
STI Information from the NCSD

Gonorrhea

Introduction
Test Overview
This test checks for the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States.

Common Symptoms
Painful urination
Pain during sex
Discharge
Pelvic pain
Itching around the genitals

Who should get tested?
This test is recommended for anyone who wants to know about their sexual health, as well as those who:
● Have had unprotected sex
● Share or have shared injection drug needles.
● Have symptoms of an STI.
● Are concerned they’ve been exposed to an STI.
● Are pregnant.

Get tested every year if you:
● Are a man who has sex with men.
● Are a sexually-active woman under 25 years of age.
● Are a woman 25 years of age or older with new or multiple sex partners, or your partner has an STI.

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with being tested for gonorrhea.

How to prepare for the test
A gonorrhea test is done through a urine sample. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results
●Positive:
If you test positive for gonorrhea, please note that it is a curable STI. Many people with gonorrhea have no signs or symptoms. You can pass the infection to others even if you do not have symptoms. It’s important to get treated right away. If left untreated, gonorrhea can cause serious health issues in both women and men.

●Negative: If you test negative, that means that you are not infected with gonorrhea.

Next Steps
Positive
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can speak to a board-certified, PWNHealth doctor at no additional cost. The doctor may be able to prescribe medication for you, if appropriate. To schedule your session, please call the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time. 
You can also take your results to your doctor, a walk-in clinic, a sexual health clinic, or a local health department to get treatment.
This test only checks for gonorrhea in the genital area. If you engage in risky sexual behavior or think you may have been exposed in the throat or rectum, it’s important to ask your doctor about testing for infection in those areas. 
Talk to your partners about your results. Your partners should get tested too. There are resources available from your local health department that can help you notify your partners.

Negative
If you’re having symptoms, it could mean that you have an infection or another condition. Ask your doctor if you need further testing.
If you think you may have been exposed to a STI, it may be too soon to tell if you have gonorrhea. Ask your doctor if you need to get retested.
This only checks for gonorrhea in the genital area. If you engage in risky sexual behavior or think you may have been exposed in the throat or rectum, it’s important to ask your doctor about testing for infection in those areas.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.,Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

More Information
Positive
If a doctor prescribes medication to you, it’s important to take it exactly as prescribed. You should also take all of the medication, even if your symptoms go away before you finish all of it. Do not share your medication with anyone.
Do not have sex for at least seven (7) days after you’ve finished your medication. You may need to be tested again after the medication is complete to check that the infection is gone. Ask your doctor if getting tested again is right for you.

Questions For Your Provider
Positive
Should I get tested for other STIs?
What is the treatment for gonorrhea?
Is there anything else I need to know about the treatment for gonorrhea?
How will I know when I can no longer spread this infection to others?
When can I have sex again?
Can gonorrhea cause other health problems?
(If pregnant) How does gonorrhea affect my pregnancy?

Tips to Prevent Infection
Practice safe sex. You can get gonorrhea again, even if you have had it in the past.
Use condoms and dental dams every time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. These safe-sex practices lower your chances of getting an STI. Other birth control methods like the pill and IUDs will not protect you from getting an STI.
Avoid sexual contact with anyone who has symptoms of an STI or who may have been exposed to one.
Talk to your partners about their STI history before having sex.

Helpful Resources
STI Information from the CDC
STI Information from the NCSD

Syphilis

Introduction
Test Overview
This test checks for exposure to the bacteria that causes syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

Common Symptoms
Sores that are usually painless
Red rash on your palms or soles of your feet

Who should get tested?
This test is recommended for anyone who wants to know about their sexual health, as well as those who:
● Have had unprotected sex
● Share or have shared injection drug needles.
● Have symptoms of an STI.
● Are concerned they’ve been exposed to an STI.
● Are pregnant.

Get tested every year if you:
● Are a man who has sex with men.

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with being tested for syphilis

How to prepare for the test
A syphilis test will include taking a blood sample from a vein or fingertip. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results
●Positive:
If you test positive for syphilis, please note that it is a curable STI. People with syphilis have certain symptoms, depending on how long they’ve had it. You can pass the infection to others even if you do not have symptoms at this time. It’s important to get treated right away. If left untreated, syphilis can cause serious health issues.

●Negative: If you test negative, that means you are not infected with syphilis.

Next Steps
Positive
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can speak to a board-certified, PWNHealth doctor at no additional cost. To schedule your session, please call the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time.
Take your results to your doctor, a walk-in clinic, a sexual health clinic, or a local health department to get treatment.
Talk to your partners about your results. Your partners should get tested too. There are resources available from your local health department that can help you notify your partners.

Negative
If you’re having symptoms, it could mean that you have an infection or another condition. Ask your doctor if you need further testing. 
If you think you may have been exposed to an STI, it may be too soon to tell if you have syphilis. Ask your doctor if you need to be retested.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

More Information
Positive
Do not have sex for at least seven (7) days after you’ve finished your medication. You may need to be tested again after the medication is complete to check that the infection is gone. Ask your doctor if getting tested again is right for you.

Questions For Your Provider
Positive
Should I get tested for other STIs?
What is the treatment for syphilis?
Is there anything else I need to know about the treatment for syphilis?
How will I know when I can no longer spread this infection to others?
When can I have sex again?
Can syphilis cause other health problems?
(If pregnant) How does syphilis affect my pregnancy?

Tips to Prevent Infection
Practice safe sex. You can get syphilis again, even if you have had it in the past.
Use condoms and dental dams every time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. These safe-sex practices lower your chances of getting an STI. Other birth control methods like the pill and IUDs will not protect you from getting an STI.
Avoid sexual contact with anyone who has symptoms of an STI or who may have been exposed to one.
Talk to your partners about their STI history before having sex.

Helpful Resources
STI Information from the CDC
STI Information from the NCSD

HIV

Introduction
Test Overview
This test checks for HIV, a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that damages the immune system.

Common Symptoms
Fever
Headache
Muscle aches and joint pain
Rash
Sore throat and painful mouth sores
Weight loss

Who should get tested?
Everyone between the ages of 18 and 65 should be tested for HIV at least once.

This test is recommended if you:
Are a man who has sex with men.
Have new or multiple sex partners.
Have had unprotected sex with someone at high-risk of HIV.
Share or have shared injection drugs needles.
Have symptoms of an STI.
Are concerned you’ve been exposed to an STI.
Have had another STI since your last test.
Have hepatitis or tuberculosis (TB).

Testing Process
Risks Involved
There are no risks involved with being tested for HIV

How to prepare for the test
A HIV test will include taking a blood sample from a vein or fingertip. Note that it may take 2-6 weeks after your exposure to detect an active HIV infection. There is no preparation needed for this test.

Your Results
●Positive:
Testing positive means that you are infected with HIV. People with HIV may or may not have symptoms. You can pass the infection to others even if you do not have symptoms. It’s important to get treated right away. If left untreated, HIV can cause serious health issues.

●Negative: If you test negative, that means that you are not infected with HIV.

Next Steps
Positive
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can speak to a board-certified, PWNHealth doctor at no additional cost. To schedule your session, please call the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time.
Take your results to your doctor, a walk-in clinic, a sexual health clinic, or a local health department to get treatment.
Talk to your partners about your results. Your partners should get tested too. There are resources available from your local health department that can help you notify your partners.
The CDC offers resources to help you locate HIV support and treatment in your area. You can access these resources by visiting the CDC website via the links below (“Helpful Resources”).

Negative
If you’re having symptoms, it could mean that you have an infection or another condition. Ask your doctor if you need further testing.
If you think you may have been exposed to an STI, it may be too soon to tell if you have HIV. Ask your doctor if you need to be retested.
If you have questions about this test or your results, you can contact the PWNHealth Care Coordination Team at 1-888-362-4321, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Eastern Time. You can also leave a message after hours and a PWNHealth team member will call you back as soon as possible.

More Information
Positive
There’s no cure for HIV, but medication can slow down the damage the virus causes and lower the chance that you’ll spread it to others. Your doctor may prescribe antiretroviral therapy (ART), a combination of medicines that lowers the amount of HIV in your blood. t’s important to take the medication exactly as prescribed, even if you have no symptoms. This will help prevent long-term health problems.

Take care of your emotional health. Talk to a counselor or therapist who’s trained to help people with HIV. Your emotional health can affect your physical health, so it’s an important part of HIV treatment.

Questions For Your Provider
Positive
Should I get tested for other STIs?
What medicines are right for me?
Can I have sex?
How can I prevent spreading HIV to others?
Can HIV cause other health problems?
(If pregnant) How does HIV affect my pregnancy?
Can you suggest a counselor or therapist for support?

Tips to Prevent Infection
Practice safe sex.
Use condoms and dental dams every time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. These safe-sex practices lower your chances of getting an STI. Other birth control methods like the pill and IUDs will not protect you from getting an STI.
Avoid sexual contact with anyone who has symptoms of an STI or who may have been exposed to one.
Talk to your partners about their STI history before having sex.

Avoid contact with blood and bodily fluids
Do not share injection drug needles, syringes, or medical equipment.

Helpful Resources
Living with HIV from the CDC
HIV Hotlines from the CDC
STI Information from the NCSD